He’s Already Shown Us

I’m talking about a song today, but, for a change, this is a modern song. Although probably no one would either know or care that I quoted the lyrics here, for copyright reasons, I can’t do that.

So here is the YouTube video.

Aside from the initial ignorance in the first verse, where the songwriter speaks as if he’s able to hide things from an all-knowing God, when I first heard this song, I sort of liked it. But to be perfectly honest, I thought it was a little impertinent. “Show me this, show me that.” As if God is obligated to do what we want in order to secure our favor. I mean, I believe in cultivating a close relationship with God, but does that mean we should go around making demands of Him?

Eventually, I kinda got over myself in that regard. I daresay the Psalms make requests in a tone that could be interpreted as either demanding or pleading. And God does not turn His ear away from our pleas.

With this new viewpoint, I listened to the song some more, and I finally understood why it didn’t ring true for me.

It was the questions themselves.

The songwriter asks the questions almost as if he hopes desperately to receive an answer yet doesn’t really expect one.

But these questions have already been answered.

The songwriter asks God to show him five things:

  1. That a broken life is redeemable.
  2. That God can handle blunt honesty.
  3. That God never lets go.
  4. That God’s love will never leave.
  5. That grace is for people like the songwriter.

That a broken life is redeemable.

Have you read the story of David lately? How he fell into spectacular sin, but when he repented, God redeemed him.

Or the story of Mary Magdalene? She was possessed by seven demons. (If that’s not broken, tell me what is.) Jesus cast them out, and Mary became one of his most devoted followers—and the first to see Him after the resurrection.

Or the story of Paul? The man killed Jesus’ followers, but Jesus redeemed him and the Holy Spirit inspired him to write a large portion of the New Testament.

Those are just a few examples from Scripture. A broken life, be it ever so shattered, is definitely redeemable.

That God can handle blunt honesty.

I’m not sure exactly what the songwriter means by “handle,” but I guess he’s saying he doesn’t want to shock, embarrass, or turn away God by his honesty.

Have you read the book of Leviticus lately? Or Ezekiel? Or some of the other prophets? Some of the laws concerning personal hygiene and physical ailments indicate that God isn’t likely to be embarrassed. And that chapter in Ezekiel about Oholah and Oholibah is pretty shocking if you ask me. (Chapter 23, if you must know.)

I daresay honesty, even the most blunt, isn’t going to be a turn-off for God.

That God never lets go.

Here’s an interesting one because it very innocently hints at a controversial doctrine. I’m going to leave the doctrine alone and peek at few Scriptures.

If we confess our sins, He is faithful and just to forgive us our sins and to cleanse us from all unrighteousness.

-1 John 1:9 NKJV (emphasis mine)

Therefore let those who suffer according to the will of God commit their souls to Him in doing good, as to a faithful Creator.

-1 Peter 4:19 NKJV (emphasis mine)

Ephraim has encircled Me with lies,
And the house of Israel with deceit;
But Judah still walks with God,
Even with the Holy One who is faithful.

-Hosea 11:12 NKJV (emphasis mine)

God is faithful. It’s part of His nature. He’s not going to be the one walking away from you.

That God’s love will never leave.

Let me take you to one of my favorite passages.

For I am persuaded that neither death nor life, nor angels nor principalities nor powers, nor things present nor things to come,

nor height nor depth, nor any other created thing, shall be able to separate us from the love of God which is in Christ Jesus our Lord.

-Romans 8:38-39 NKJV (emphasis mine)

God’s love doesn’t run out.

That grace is for people like the songwriter.

Based on the first verse where the songwriter mentions scars, weakness, and hidden things, I suppose he thinks of himself as having a broken life to some extent. I refer you back to point one, where we see that a broken life is redeemable.

Most assuredly, grace is for broken lives. And if I may quote the most famous verse in Christendom …

For God so loved the world, that he gave his only begotten Son, that whosoever believeth in him should not perish, but have everlasting life.

-John 3:16 KJV (emphasis mine)

Whosoever. That covers everyone.

“Show me,” the song asks over and over. But He’s already shown us.

I suppose it’s not the questions I have a problem with. Doubt and insecurity come to every heart. The deeper the heart’s wounds, the more susceptible to those doubts.

The problem is the questioner is looking for answers in the wrong place. He wants a voice from heaven or a supernatural experience or something dramatic.

And while those things are lovely, and I believe they sometimes happen, that’s not where we start.

We start with the Truth God has already given us. His Word.

When we have honest questions, it’s okay to ask them. Then we should go to the Bible and find the answers.

-Miss Darcy

P.S. Lest you think I have a vendetta against MIKESCHAIR, here are two of their songs that I love. 🙂 Enjoy!

“Let the Waters Rise”

“All to Jesus”

2 thoughts on “He’s Already Shown Us

  1. I started to listen to the song to get the foundation of what you were writing about, Darcy, but from the first sound of it, I had to turn it off. I used to sing. Not just spiritual songs or hymns and gospel songs, but the stuff you hear on radio and TV. Sang for friends parties and such. Secular music. As a matter of fact, I was about to cut a record years ago when the Lord convicted me of the music I was singing and listening to.

    Yes, I’d heard in church and from other Christians all about the modern day music and how evil it was. I even had a friend who was a lounge singer before she got saved, who told me stories about music and the crowd that followed it. But it never truly hit me until the day I was asked a question.

    Prior to that, I had heard a story about a missionary to Africa whose children played modern church music. When the preacher tried to talk to a witch doctor about the drums in their ceremonies (I think that was the topic), the witch doctor asked what the difference was in his music compared to the preacher’s children’s music. I’m sure that’s what prompted my thoughts and the question.

    The question? Can the lost world see a difference in my music to my Lord? Not with the sound of music like this song. No. I won’t listen to it any more. Give me Christian music that sounds like Christian music. Modern or old. There Is a Redeemer. How Deep the Father’s Love for Us. How Firm a Foundation. Beulah Land. Not the stuff that sounds just like the world’s music.

    It’s more than the words. It’s the stirring of the Holy Spirit that comes through in the music.

    That’s my conviction. You have to follow what our Lord tells you.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Great point. I believe God created music to speak to the soul in ways that words can’t, so we need to be careful about what the music itself says.

      I heard a similar story about a witch doctor who couldn’t get his work done because his demons were attracted by the music from the youth rally at church. Yikes!

      I love those four songs you mentioned. 🙂 It’s interesting to think that most of what we think of as traditional-sounding Christian music was, at least to some extent, similar to the secular music of the time. I think it’s hilarious when people say hymns sound boring because Isaac Watts wrote his hymns to sound much more cheerful and melodic than the traditional church music of his day. Ironic.

      Like

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